Radioactive isotope dating fossils

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That's how fossils are formed, but how do we know how old they are?

The best way to date fossils is by measuring radioactive isotopes in surrounding rocks.

Elements like potassium, uranium, lead and so on come in more than one version, depending upon how many neutrons they have in their atomic nucleus. Some isotopes are radioactive, meaning that they decay, at a fixed and known rate, into a completely different element.

Physicists understand why this happens, and they know the rate at which each isotope decays.

Clearly, such huge time periods cannot be fitted into the Bible without compromising what the Bible says about the goodness of God and the origin of sin, death and suffering—the reason Jesus came into the world (See Six Days? He said, This only makes sense with a time-line beginning with the creation week thousands of years ago.By 1907 study of the decay products of uranium (lead and intermediate radioactive elements that decay to lead) demonstrated to B. Boltwood that the lead/uranium ratio in uranium minerals increased with geologic age and might provide a geological dating tool.As radioactive Parent atoms decay to stable daughter atoms (as uranium decays to lead) each disintegration results in one more atom of the daughter than was initially present and one less atom of the parent.These radioactive elements constitute independent clocks that allow geologists to determine the age of the rocks in which they occur.Geologists often need to know the age of material that they find.

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